2014 Alene Valkanas State Arts Advocacy Award Winner

Donna S. Collins currently serves as Executive Director of Ohio Citizens for the Arts (OCA) and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (OAAE) with offices in Columbus, Ohio. As a leader in the advocacy and arts education fields, Collins has had the opportunity to work extensively with national, statewide, and local organizations. Through Collins’ leadership OAAE and OCA, both statewide not for profits, maintain strong relationships with Ohio’s statewide agencies and professional organizations to support the arts and arts education. Through these partnerships, Collins has helped to foster a diverse community of arts advocates, educators, artists, and professional organizations which cultivate local, statewide, and national initiatives and actions that directly impact children, families, communities, and the creative economy in and through the arts.

In February, 2014 the Ohio Arts Council (OAC) Board selected Collins as the new OAC executive director. Collins will succeed current OAC executive director Julie S. Henahan, who is retiring in July 2014 after 30 years of service to the agency.

Donna and her husband, Howard, have three sons: TJ, Joshua (Deidre), and Ryan. They are blessed with a grandgirl, Cierra, who is 9, and a grandboy, Chance, who is 4. The family lives in Glenford, Ohio and is actively involved in volunteer efforts to support the arts and arts education.

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U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown Honored with 2014 National Award for Congressional Arts Leadership

Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education, in conjunction with The United States Conference of Mayors, presented the 2014 National Award for Congressional Arts Leadership to Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH). The award, which recognizes distinguished public service on behalf of the arts, was presented on Tuesday, March 25 at the Congressional Arts Kick Off during Arts Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill.

Brown has received many accolades from local arts organizations, a tribute showing that the arts build communities and help areas revitalize and prosper.

“Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown has an outstanding track record on supporting arts-related issues on the federal level, and we are delighted that he is receiving the Congressional Arts Leadership Award. As a testimony to his commitment to the arts, Senator Brown recently visited several cultural organizations in Northwest Ohio to deepen his understanding of how the arts impact both economic and workforce development and the quality of life for his constituents. The arts are fortunate to have the Senator as a champion, and we congratulate him on this prestigious award,” said Marc D. Folk, president, Ohio Citizens for the Arts.

“Sen. Brown has certainly been very supportive of public broadcasting and our role in showcasing artists of all genres to the American public through PBS and local programming efforts,” said Tom Rieland, general manager, WOSU.

“Columbus’ arts community is thriving thanks to Sen. Sherrod Brown, and other leaders, who actively champion the arts in Ohio. I am so proud to live in a community that recognizes the value of entwining art into our everyday experiences. It’s part of what makes Ohio great,” said arts advocate Judith Oppenheimer of Bexley, Ohio.

“I am so pleased that Sen. Sherrod Brown is receiving the National Award for Congressional Arts Leadership from Americans for the Arts this year. This is a much-deserved recognition of Senator Brown’s strong support of and belief in the power of the arts to transform lives and revitalize our communities. Sen. Brown has also always understood that the arts are part of a well-rounded education for our children and an integral component to a strong workforce and a diversified national economy,” said Julie Henahan, executive director, Ohio Arts Council.

“Sen. Brown has demonstrated his commitment to building and maintaining thriving communities through his support of the National Endowment for the Arts and commitment to education,” said Columbus Museum of Art Executive Director Nannette V. Maciejunes.

“Sen. Brown is a good friend and a long-tenured supporter of arts and culture, starting with his time in the Ohio House of Representatives in the mid-1970s. The entire state and nation has benefited from his dedication to arts and arts education,” said Bill Blair, legislative counsel, Ohio Citizens for the Arts.

The senator’s nomination for this award was also supported by Barbara Robinson, the chairwoman of the Ohio Arts Council for 14 years, who is now its chair emeritus and an Americans for the Arts board member.

The National Award for Congressional Arts Leadership is part of a series of Public Leadership in the Arts Awards which have been given annually since 1997 by Americans for the Arts and The United States Conference of Mayors.

Americans for the Arts is the leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America. With offices in Washington, D.C. and New York City, it has a record of more than 50 years of service. Americans for the Arts is dedicated to representing and serving local communities and creating opportunities for every American to participate in and appreciate all forms of the arts. Additional information is available at www.AmericansForTheArts.org.

The United States Conference of Mayors is the official nonpartisan organization of cities with populations of 30,000 or more. There are 1,139 such cities in the country today, each represented in the Conference by its chief elected official, the Mayor. Additional information is available at www.USMayors.org.
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News from Ohio Citizens for the Arts

Ohio Citizens for the Arts Announces the New William R. Joseph Ohio Arts Advocacy Medal 
 
Nominations Are Open!
 
Ohio Citizens for the Arts will celebrate the life and legacy of arts advocacy to honor our founder William R. Joseph through an annual award beginning in 2014.

The William R. Joseph Ohio Arts Advocacy Medal will be given annually as part of the Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio and Arts Day Luncheon. Ohio Citizens for the Arts’ members (individuals and organizational members) may make nominations now through February 28, 2014.

Nominations will be accepted by US mail at: Ohio Citizens for the Arts, 77 South High Street, 2nd floor, Columbus, Ohio 43215-6108, or by email at:donnacollins@OhioCitizensForTheArts.org All nominations must be postmarked no later than February 28.

A nomination includes the completed items listed below:
  • Award Nomination Form
  • Letter of Recommendation documenting the nominees’ high-level of strategic engagement as an advocate for governmental support of the arts.
  • Image/photo of the nominee
  • Nominations are accepted only from Ohio Citizens for the Arts’ members (individual or organization). Download the nomination form here.
Questions may be answered by calling the Ohio Citizens for the Arts office at 614.221.4064.
 

Registration Opens for the 2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio & Arts Day Luncheon
Registration is now open for the 2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio luncheon. This year marks the 43rd anniversary of the luncheon, which will be held at noon on May 21, 2014 at the Columbus Athenaeum in downtown Columbus. The luncheon is hosted by the Ohio Arts Council and the Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation. Single tickets, which must be purchased online at the Ohio Arts Council website, are $50 and include lunch and a dessert reception. Table sponsorships are available through the Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation. Registration closes on April 21, 2014.
Six winners, selected from 76 nominations submitted by individuals and organizations across the state, will be honored at the luncheon ceremony along with members of the Ohio Legislature. Winners will receive an original work of art by Ohio painter Steven Walker at a public ceremony during the luncheon.
The award categories and recipients are: Arts Administration, Sherri Geldin, Wexner Center for the Arts(Columbus); Arts Education, Dancing Wheels Company & School (Cleveland); Arts Patron, The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation (Cincinnati); Business Support of the Arts, Macy’s, Inc. (Statewide); Community Development and Participation, Neal Gittleman, Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra (Dayton); Individual Artist, Sheri Williams, Dayton Contemporary Dance Company (Dayton).
Additionally, advertisements may be purchased online for the Governor’s Awards program. Placing an advertisement in the luncheon program is an excellent way to congratulate a winner, promote an upcoming season, exhibition or performance, highlight a tourism venue or thank legislators for their support of the arts.
The 2014 Governor’s Awards ceremony and luncheon will be held in conjunction with Arts Day on May 21, 2014. Arts Day was created to foster a greater awareness of the value of the arts in Ohio. Citizens are encouraged to participate in Arts Day by visiting with their state legislators and communicating the need for public support of the arts and arts education.
Every year on Arts Day, Columbus is filled with arts supporters who share the importance of the arts in their communities. For more information on how to participate, or how to purchase table sponsorships for the luncheon, contact the Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation atinfo@ohiocitizensforthearts.org or 614/221-4064.
The 2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio and Arts Day Luncheon are presented in partnership with the Ohio Government Telecommunications.

Additional Opportunities to Participate in Arts Day and the Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio Luncheon
Table sponsorships are available through the Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation. The details of purchasing a table sponsorship are as follows:

Cost: $1,000 ($500 of which is tax deductible) Payment for the table can be made to the Ohio Citizens For the Arts Foundation 77 South High Street, Floor 2 Columbus, Ohio 43215.

Seating: 10 seats for the guests of your choice. We encourage you to invite a legislator to join you at your table. If you would like to do so, please let us know who you would like to have join you and we will extend the invite to the legislator’s office on your behalf.

Recognition: Table signage, event signage for the day of the event, recognition in the program. Seating near the front of the stage for better viewing.

Participate in the 2014 Arts Day Showcase. This event is an opportunity for you to showcase your organization to hundreds of individuals from around Ohio participating in Arts Day.  On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 the Showcase will be held at the Columbus Athenaeum, 34 North Fourth Street, Columbus, Ohio to coincide with the arrival of attendees, including members of the Ohio Legislature, to the Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio and Arts Day Luncheon.  To secure your spot as a 2014 Arts Day Showcase participant, contact Janelle at Ohio Citizens for the Arts by phone at 614.221.4064 or email janelle@ohiocitizensforthearts.org for an application. Spots for the Arts Day Showcase are provided on a first come first serve basis.
Purchase an Ad in the Governor’s Awards for the Arts Luncheon Program. Click hereto download the ADVERTISING ORDER FORM.
Don’t miss this valuable opportunity to:
  • Recognize outstanding contributions to the arts in your community
  • Advertise an upcoming season
  • Thank your legislators for their support of the arts
  • Congratulate a winner
To reserve your space in the event program, complete the Advertising Order Form by Friday, February 21, 2014.
Due to technical difficulties with our website, the Ohio Arts Council will NOT be offering online payment for ads this year. Instead, please send a check made out to the Ohio Arts Council, along with your order form, to:
Ohio Arts Council
Attn: Elizabeth Weinstein
30 E. Broad St., 33rd Floor, Columbus, OH 43215
elizabeth.weinstein@oac.state.oh.us
Fax: 614/466-4494
Participate in the 2014 Arts Day Showcase. This event is an opportunity for you to showcase your organization to hundreds of individuals from around Ohio participating in Arts Day.  On Wednesday, May 21, 2014 the Showcase will be held at the Columbus Athenaeum, 34 North Fourth Street, Columbus, Ohio to coincide with the arrival of attendees, including members of the Ohio Legislature, to the Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio and Arts Day Luncheon.  We hope to generate a large amount of people traffic at the Columbus Athenaeum between 10:30 AM and 2:30 PM.
 
To secure your space for the 2014 Ohio Arts Organizations Showcase email Janelle atjanelle@ohiocitizensforthearts.org for an application!  Space is limited and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Arts & Autism in Ohio Research Initiative, Phase II Request for Proposals 
VSA Ohio
Proposal submission deadline: March 7, 2014
Award notification: March 12, 2014
Project Completion Date: May 23, 2014

Overview
Research question: How can the Ohio Arts Council, a state agency, better support access to the arts for students and young people living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)?

The Arts & Autism in Ohio Initiative began in the fall of 2012 and its first phase was implemented in spring/summer 2013. The Ohio Arts Council (OAC) commissioned VSA Ohio (VSAO) to conduct a research project to answer the above question. VSAO used three primary data collection methods: an online survey, focus groups, and a review of the literature. Research yielded rich information, themes and ideas to continue moving the Initiative further. However, limits to the data existed and additional information is sought to better answer the research question. The current Phase II of this project includes collecting information from Ohioans about their perceptions, needs and ideas for how the OAC can better support people living with ASD. A particular emphasis shall be placed on collecting information from geographic areas beyond the three major urban centers in Ohio and to a broad range of constituents.

This is an exciting opportunity to be part of a groundbreaking initiative. To date, the researchers have not identified a similar research initiative anywhere in the country. There are innumerable institutions, programs, and individuals who are working to make the arts accessible to people with autism Spectrum Disorder. However, no other statewide initiatives or leaders are pursuing this question of arts-access-autism with similarly broad perspectives and/or goals. The project has received recognition and attention from national partners such as VSA, The Kennedy Center, and National Endowment for the Arts.

Process
Interested consultants are asked to submit proposals that include the following information:

  • A narrative outlining how the consultant will approach this project, including a timeline.
  • A budget not to exceed $10,000. Proposals are permitted to include budgets with various optional components.
  • Current resume or vita of key personnel.
  • Summary of experience on projects of a similar scope/nature.
  • A sample work product from a project of a similar scope/nature.
  • A list of two professional references, at least one of which are from projects of a similar scope/nature including current contact information.

Primary Responsibilities of the Consultant
1. Utilize the Arts & Autism in Ohio Initiative Phase I Report, provided by VSA Ohio upon
selection, to assist with project design and implementation.
2. Identify and articulate the appropriate research methodologies for gathering data aimed at
answering the research question.
3. Identify, articulate, and implement the methodology by which the data will be collected.
4. Identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to the research question.
5. Identify costs and benefits unanticipated by the Ohio Arts Council and VSA Ohio.

Deliverables should include but not be limited to the following:
Final report including introduction that includes background, history, and context, methodology, results, analysis, and conclusion.

Costs
All travel, administrative and operational costs would be the responsibility of the consultant. Payment will be made at the conclusion of the project when all responsibilities have been met and deliverables received by VSA Ohio.

Assumptions and Agreements
The following assumptions shall apply to the final contract:

  • The expected budget for the project is not more than $10,000.
  • Work must be completed by Friday, May 23, 2014.
  • All written, electronic, or multimedia documents, presentations, reports, studies, or other types of documentation are the exclusive property of VSA Ohio and Ohio Arts Council.
  • The consultant will ensure cultural competence, relevance and inclusiveness in all methods, actions and communications.
  • The consultant will take all steps possible to protect the confidentiality, anonymity, privacy, safety and reputations of all informants and participants.

How to Apply
Proposals should include a cover sheet identifying the consultant and all pertinent contact information. The narrative will clearly identify the approaches and methodologies that will be employed to develop the feasibility study, a tentative project timeline, brief bios of key personnel, and what experience the consultant is able to bring to the project. A separate sheet should be included for the budget overview. Applicants should also include information on their company and/or relevant past work and clients.

Proposals may be sent by email to ehoppe@vsao.org or by regular mail to:

Erin Hoppe, Executive Director
VSA Ohio
77 South Front Street, 2nd Floor
Columbus, Ohio 43215-6108

All proposals must be received by 5:00 p.m. March 7, 2014.

Additional Information
If you have any questions concerning this project, please contact Erin Hoppe at 614.241.5325 or email at ehoppe@vsao.org.

Funding
This project is commissioned by the Ohio Arts Council, a state agency, with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and VSA Ohio.

N.E.A. Funds Benefit Both Rich and Poor, Study Finds

Ever since the late 1980s, when the performance artist Karen Finley started playing around with yams and chocolate, the National Endowment for the Arts has come under fire from some conservative lawmakers. Back then the agency was castigated for giving grants to provocative artists like Ms. Finley, whom some critics called obscene.

Now House Republicans charge that the endowment supports programming primarily attended by the rich, causing “a wealth transfer from poorer to wealthier citizens.”

A new study to be released on Wednesday challenges that assertion, however, and concludes that federally supported arts programs attract people across the income spectrum; the wealthy, yes, but also many below the poverty line.

The study, by the National Center for Arts Research at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, was specifically intended to test lawmakers’ propositions about arts funding.

Last year the House Budget Committee, led by Representative Paul D. Ryan, Republican of Wisconsin, issued a proposed budget for the 2014 fiscal year, which eliminated all funding for the arts endowment as well as the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

It stated that these agencies’ activities were “generally enjoyed by people of higher-income levels, making them a wealth transfer from poorer to wealthier citizens.”

To assess that statement, university researchers first looked at income differences in places that receive arts grants and those that don’t. They discovered that the bigger and more economically diverse the community, the more likely it was to receive a grant.

These areas have a greater proportion of both poor and rich households, researchers said.

In addition, they found that arts grants led poorer people to attend an event just as much as those in higher tax brackets.

“There is not a disproportionate benefit to wealthy individuals,” said Zannie Giraud Voss, the director of the arts research center at Southern Methodist. “The poor are as likely to benefit as the wealthy.” (The center receives no federal funding, although it relies on the endowment agency for some of the data is uses in its research.)

William Allison, the press secretary for the House committee, said, “We’ll let the statement in our budget blueprint speak for itself.”

The National Endowment for the Arts has long been targeted by many conservative members of Congress.

They were outraged, for example, that the agency had awarded grants to Ms. Finley, who smeared chocolate and yams over her naked body; a grant to support a touring exhibition of work by Robert Mapplethorpe, known for his homoerotic and sexually explicit photographs; and to Andres Serrano, an artist who immersed a crucifix in a jar of urine.

In the mid-1990s Congress slashed the agency’s funding by 40 percent. In the years that followed, the endowment all but halted its grants to individual artists and focused instead on financing cultural organizations and programs that offer increased access to the arts.

Meanwhile, endowment chiefs took pains to cultivate support from the left and the right. Over the years, financing slowly inched its way toward pre-1990s levels.

The 2014 appropriation is $146 million, said Victoria Hutter, an endowment spokeswoman.

The agency has also been without a permanent chairman for more than a year.


Obama to nominate Jane Chu to chair National Endowment for the Arts

President Obama announced that he plans to nominate Jane Chu as chair of the National Endowment for the Arts – a position that has remained vacant for more than a year.

Since 2006, Chu has been president of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts in Kansas City where she oversaw completion of the sprawling center a $326 million project finished in 2011 using private funds.

“Jane’s lifelong passion for the arts and her background in philanthropy have made her a powerful advocate for artists and arts education in Kansas City,” Obama said in a statement. “She knows firsthand how art can open minds, transform lives and revitalize communities, and believes deeply in the importance of the arts to our national culture.”

Source: Washington Post

Ohio Citizens for the Arts’ Board of Directors
Officers: Marc Folk, President; Tim Greenwood, Immediate Past President; Bill Hilyard,Vice President; Mary Gimpel, Vice President; Barbara Hunzicker, Vice President; Richard Swanson, Treasurer; and Dave McElwee, Secretary

                                 

Term Directors: MJ Albacete, Hunt Brawley, Pat Bridgman, Bill Conner, Heather Densmore, Trey Devey, Christine Dodd, Julius Dorsey, Jr., Gary Hanson, David Harmon, Cheri Mitchell, Tom Johnson, Peter Lawson Jones, Joy Padgett, Stephen Pleasnick, Emily Prince, Katerina Ruedi Ray, Michael Roediger, James Sanders, III, David Seyer, Press Southworth, III, Jeff Strayer, Kristy Szemetylo, Paul Vincent,  Carla Walker, and Cindy Wood
President’s Advisory Council and Statewide Arts Service Organization Representatives: Faye Heston, Canton; Jane D’Angelo, OhioDance; Erin Hoppe, VSA Ohio; Jarrod Hartzler, Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
Staff: Donna S. Collins, Executive Director; William P. Blair, Legislative Counsel; and Janelle Hallett, Member Services Coordinator
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Ohio Citizens for the Arts Announces the New William R. Joseph Ohio Arts Advocacy Medal

Nominations Are Open!

Ohio Citizens for the Arts will celebrate the life and legacy of arts advocacy to honorour founder William R. Joseph through an annual award beginning in 2014.

The William R. Joseph Ohio Arts Advocacy Medal will be given annually as part of the Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio and Arts Day Luncheon. Ohio Citizens for the Arts’ members (individuals and organizational members) may make nominations now through February 28, 2014.

Nominations will be accepted by US mail at: Ohio Citizens for the Arts, 77 South High Street, 2nd floor, Columbus, Ohio 43215-6108, or by email at:donnacollins@OhioCitizensForTheArts.org All nominations must be postmarked no later than February 28.

A nomination includes the completed items listed below:

  • Award Nomination Form
  • Letter of Recommendation documenting the nominees’ high-level of strategic engagement as an advocate for governmental support of the arts.
  • Image/photo of the nominee

Nominations are accepted only from Ohio Citizens for the Arts’ members (individual or organization). Download the nomination form here.

Questions may be answered by calling the Ohio Citizens for the Arts office at 614.221.4064.

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Students from Six Ohio High Schools Chosen to Participate in Arts Day 2014

In an effort to educate young people about the legislative process, Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation, with the help of the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, invited high schools from around Ohio to participate in Arts Day 2014. Arts Day, co-presented annually by Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council, offers opportunities for citizens to express their support of public funding for the arts and arts education to state legislators.

Schools selected to participate in Arts Day 2014 are Clark Shawnee High School, Springfield; Eastwood High School, Pemberville; Federal Hocking Secondary, Stewart; Princeton High School, Cincinnati; Reynoldsburg High School – Encore Academy, Columbus; and Shaker Heights High School, Shaker Heights. More than 40 high schools expressed interest in the event.

Each high school will choose ten students to participate in the event based on their ability to be successful student advocates. Advocates must have an interest in the arts and the legislative process, an ability to speak in public with individuals or small groups, and willingness to follow through with written assignments.

Prior to Arts Day, each participating school hosts a state legislator who shares information regarding the state government process and the legislator receives information on the school’s arts education and civics programs. The Student Advocates receive professional training on advocacy and public speaking. On Arts Day, May 21, the student advocates will travel to Columbus to spend the morning speaking with legislators about the impact the arts have had on their lives. In the afternoon, they will attend the 2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio and Arts Day Luncheon.

For more information about the legislative school visits and Arts Day meetings please contact Janelle Hallett at Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation, 614.221.4064.

# # #

2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio

Six winners have been selected to receive the 2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio. The awards will be presented at a luncheon ceremony honoring the winners and members of the Ohio Legislature at noon on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at the Columbus Athenaeum in downtown Columbus. The luncheon is hosted by the Ohio Arts Council and Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation. Winners will receive an original work of art by Ohio painter Steven Walker at a public ceremony during the luncheon.

Winners were selected from 76 nominations submitted by individuals and organizations throughout Ohio. The award categories and recipients are: Arts Administration, Sherri Geldin, Wexner Center for the Arts (Columbus); Arts Education, Dancing Wheels Company & School (Cleveland); Arts Patron, The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation (Cincinnati); Business Support of the Arts, Macy’s, Inc. (Statewide); Community Development and Participation, Neal Gittleman, Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra (Dayton); Individual Artist, Sheri Williams, Dayton Contemporary Dance Company (Dayton).

More information about the Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio, including a full list of winners, past and present, is available on the Ohio Arts Council Web site atwww.oac.state.oh.us.

Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation provides education about the arts in Ohio and educates citizens about ways to participate effectively in their government. The OCA Foundation partners with the Ohio Arts Council in the annual presentation of the Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio and Arts Day Luncheon.

The Ohio Arts Council is a state agency that funds and supports quality arts experiences to strengthen Ohio communities culturally, educationally, and economically.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Janelle Hallett, Member Services Director

Email: janelle@ohiocitizensforthearts.org

Telephone: 614.221.4064 Fax: 614.241.5329

Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation
77 South High Street, 2nd Floor
Columbus, Ohio 43215-6108

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News from Ohio Citizens for the Arts

2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio Winners Announced

Six winners have been selected to receive the 2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio. The awards will be presented at a luncheon ceremony honoring the winners and members of the Ohio Legislature at noon on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at the Columbus Athenaeum in downtown Columbus. The luncheon is hosted by the Ohio Arts Council and Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation. Winners will receive an original work of art by Ohio painter Steven Walker at a public ceremony during the luncheon.

Winners were selected from 76 nominations submitted by individuals and organizations throughout Ohio. The award categories and recipients are: Arts Administration, Sherri Geldin, Wexner Center for the Arts (Columbus); Arts Education, Dancing Wheels Company & School (Cleveland); Arts Patron, The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation (Cincinnati); Business Support of the Arts, Macy’s, Inc. (Statewide); Community Development and Participation, Neal Gittleman, Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra (Dayton); Individual Artist, Sheri Williams, Dayton Contemporary Dance Company (Dayton).

In attendance at the 2014 Governor’s Awards Selection Committee meeting were four Ohio Arts Council board members and three members who were selected by Ohio Citizens for the Arts. They were: Committee Chair Sara Vance Waddell (Cincinnati), Juan Cespedes (Columbus), Jane Foulk (Thornville), Sharon Howard (Dayton), Katerina Ruedi Ray (Bowling Green), Jeff Strayer (North Canton) and Buzz Ward (Cincinnati).

The Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio & Arts Day Luncheon will be held in conjunction with Arts Day on Wednesday, May 21, 2014. This daylong event demonstrating public value and support for the arts is sponsored by the Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation. Arts Day will include an arts advocacy briefing, legislative visits, an arts showcase, Statehouse tours and student exhibitions. For more information on Arts Day 2014, visit http://www.ohiocitizensforthearts.org or call 614/221-4064.

Arts Day was created to foster a greater awareness of the value of the arts in Ohio. Citizens are encouraged to participate in Arts Day by visiting with their state legislators and communicating the need for public support of the arts and arts education. Every year on Arts Day, the Capitol is filled with arts supporters sharing the importance of the arts to their communities.

The 2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio & Arts Day Luncheon are presented in partnership with the Ohio Channel.

CLICK HERE FOR 2014 GOVERNOR’S AWARDS WINNER BIOGRAPHIES

More information about the Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio & Arts Day Luncheon, including a full list of past winners and program advertising information, is available on the Ohio Arts Council website.

National Arts Advocacy Day 2014 March 24 and 25, 2014

Hosted by Americans for the Arts and cosponsored by 85+ national arts organizations, National Arts Advocacy Day is the largest gathering of its kind, bringing together a broad cross section of America’s cultural and civic organizations. Grassroots advocates from across the country come to Washington DC to meet with their members of Congress in support of issues like arts education policy, the charitable tax deduction, and funding for the National Endowment for the Arts.

What’s At Stake In 2014? Between tax reform, budget battles, and education reauthorization, support for arts and arts education is facing many challenges on Capitol Hill this year. As Congress and the administration grapple with ever-changing policy proposals, it is imperative that arts advocates come to Washington, DC to make sure the arts to make their voices heard!

How to Register

There are three easy ways to register:

1. Register online

2. Register by mail

Download our printable PDF registration form and mail to:
Americans for the Arts
c/o Meetings & Events
P.O. Box 91261
Washington, DC 20090-1261

3. Register by fax

Download our printable PDF registration form and fax to:
F 202.371.0424
Attn: Meetings and Events

Registration and Admission Policies Note: Registration payments made with credit card can be processed online, by fax, or by mail. However, payments made by check, purchase order number, or registrations for students can only be processed by mail. If registration form and payment are not received by Monday, March 10, 2014, you must register on site at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC.

Admission Procedures: You are required to wear your name badge to all conference events and meal functions. Admission will be denied to those without a badge. Replacement badges may be purchased at the Registration Desk for $50.

Advance Registration Deadline: All advance registration payments must be received by Monday, March 10, 2014. Registrations received after this deadline will not be processed in advance. You will be asked to register on site and provide payment at that time.

Lunch with State and District Captains: During the lunch break on Monday, March 24, 2014, you will have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with your Arts Advocacy Day State and District Captains and plan your lobbying visits to Capitol Hill. Boxed lunch tickets for this event are $25 each and must be purchased in advance, no later than the registration deadline, Monday, March 10, 2014. On-site sales cannot be guaranteed.

Student Registrations: Individual full time students are eligible to register at the student rate of $75/$110 (Early-Bird/Advanced deadline). Students must register by paper form and submit a copy of a valid student ID.

Payment: Registrations are not considered complete until all fees are paid in full. All payments must be received by Monday, March 10, 2014. Registrations received after this date will not be processed in advance and you will be asked to register on site and provide payment at that time. Payment of registrations secured by Purchase Order must be received by Monday, March 10, 2014. If payment by purchase order is not received by this date, the attendee will be required to provide a credit card and sign a payment authorization form to guarantee payment at the onsite Registration Desk before receiving credentials.

Confirmation: All attendees will receive confirmation of registration via e-mail. If you have not received a confirmation notice within three weeks of submitting your registration, or if you wish to change your registration information, please contact us by e-mail at events@artsusa.org.

Refunds: All requests for refunds must be made in writing to Americans for the Arts c/o Meetings and Events. Full refunds, minus a $25 administrative fee, will be issued to requests received by Monday, March 10, 2014. Refund requests received after this deadline will not be considered.

Lessons In How To Build A Successful Contest, From The Knight Foundation

Instead of waiting for interesting projects to apply for money, the Knight Foundation has started offering competitions to find ways to give away funds. Here’s how they make it work.

Grant applications are difficult for the uninitiated, and leave a lot of people with good ideas–but without grant application skill sets–from getting the money they need to move forward. Over 99% of all grant-making foundations in the U.S. still rely on the typical application process.

Not the Knight Foundation. The organization has held (or funded) nearly a dozen grantmaking contests since 2007, giving over $75 million to 400 winners–schools, business, nonprofits, and individuals. The first contest, and one of the most well-known, is the Knight News Challenge, which funds “breakthrough ideas in news and information.”

With so few other foundations launching similar initiatives, the Knight Foundation had no guidebook or set of directions to help out at launch. So now the organization has created a guide for others. A new report by Mayur Patel, the vice president of strategy and assessment at the foundation, looks at the six big lessons that Knight has learned from its contests over the years.

These are the six basic lessons:

  • Contests bring new blood and new ideas
  • Contests create value beyond the winners
  • Contests help you spot emerging trends
  • Contests help you change your routine
  • Contests go hand-in-glove with existing strategies

Within those lessons, Patel has culled four overarching tips for contest-builders. The first: keep barriers to entry as low as possible. ” If you’re going to use a contest to attract new individuals who aren’t versed in how to get money from foundations, you’ve got to make these contests as simple and easy to apply to as possible,” he says.

The second tip: leverage the social web to create community around certain activities. For example, in the 2013 News Challenge, Knight partnered with OpenIDEO to create a platform that allowed entrants to get comments and feedback from the public. They were then given a week to refine their entries based on that feedback. “As we promoted the winners, we have also tried to lift up the contributing people that helped provide feedback, refinement, and comments,” adds Patel.

Patel’s third tip is to “think about how you can nurture a set of people who are interested in the topic.” And finally, he recommends making sure that the contest cycle is in line with the cycle of innovation. In other words, don’t force entrants to wait nine months to find out if they’ve won–entrepreneurs have to respond to the market more quickly than that.

Most of the lessons in the report–like having a simple entry process and mining applications for data about the communities and cities you’re working with–apply to all types of contests. Others are more specific. When Knight has done more geographically limited competitions–like the Knight Neighborhood Challenge in Macon, Georgia, it has had to “sell the steak as much as the sizzle,” according to Patel. He says: “It’s not just the winners you’ve got to focus on. You’re also trying to sell an idea that’s going to energize the city itself.”

In the case of the Neighborhood Challenge (a contest to come up with ideas that would revitalize the city’s College Hill Corridor), that meant building the competition on the back of an existing community planning process which had identified opportunities for advancing revitalization projects in Macon.

Patel believes the contests have been a boon to the Knight Foundation. “The contest format allowed us as an institution to create a safe zone for experimenting with new kinds of processes, and an open brand for our organization,” says Patel. Running these contests makes you very public, and it makes the whole process much more transparent than other aspects of foundation grant-making.”

Plus, he says, Knight has received lots of applications from people who never had applied for a grant before–and maybe never would have if not for the contest format. And when it comes to grantmaking (or any kind of funding opportunity), the more ideas, the better.

Source: Co.Exist

Ohio State to Create a World-class Arts District

According to an article in the Columbus Dispatch, Ohio State will invest $200 million to upgrade facilities for visual art, dance, music, and the performing arts over the next decade to create an arts district on campus, and connect the campus with art galleries in the Short North and the museums, theaters, and other artistic spaces Downtown.

Long term facilities plans developed by the university call for Sullivant Hall, the Wexner Center for the Arts, and the Mershon Auditorium to serve as the entrance to the arts district. The university has already spent $33 million renovating Sullivant Hall, which houses the world’s largest academic cartoon library, OSU’s dance- and art-education departments, OSU’s Advanced Computing Center for the Arts and Design, and a new center that was created with a $6 million gift from an alumnus to help students understand the business side of the arts.

Hughes Hall (music), Hopkins Hall (art and computing), and Hayes Hall (art, art history, and industrial, interior, and visual communication design), have also been renovated.

OSU is also supporting a campaign to raise funds to expand and renovate Weigel Hall and build a recital hall and teaching/rehearsal studios. The university has already committed $20 million in university funds for these renovations.

Discussions are underway to explore expanding the Wexner Center, which might include demolishing the Mershon Auditorium, and building a performing-arts complex on High Street.

The university has set aside $50 million from the interest received from the parking facilities lease agreement to support these projects.

See “Ohio State to Create World Class Arts District” by Encarnacion Pyle, The Columbus Dispatch, December 30, 2013.

High School That Teaches Through Video Games, Film and Music: Coming to Cleveland Soon?

It sounds like a teenager’s dream: A high school where you listen to music, watch movies and play video games all day.

At the planned Cleveland High School for the Digital Arts, film, music and video games won’t be things a student does behind the backs of teachers. They’ll be part of every lesson and project and assignment students have to turn in.

But, sorry kids, playing Grand Theft Auto or watching the new Hunger Games flick won’t be the norm at the school, which could be open to Cleveland students by the fall.

Games, films and music will just be the way you learn about the usual core subjects of math and history and science. And you’ll be using those art forms to show what you’ve learned. You’ll be creating games or making films about topics that students in other schools write papers or take tests about.

“It’s a tool,” said the school’s champion, Marsha Dobryzynski, of the Center for Arts-Inspired Learning, a Shaker Square non-profit formerly known as Young Audiences. “They’re going to use them as tools to access core content. It’s the hook to help them learn.”

Dobrzynski added: “They’re not going to come to school to play games. They’re going to come to school to create games.”

The school is still in early planning stages. It doesn’t have a location, principal, or teachers yet. And curriculum planning has just started, Dobrzynski said.

But the school has early support from the district and from the Cleveland and George Gund foundations, who work closely with the district. An application for nearly $400,000 for the school’s startup cost was one of the district’s four requests from the state’s new Straight-A innovation fund this fall.

The grant application described the school as “the first Ohio public school to utilize digital arts as a means to actively engage students who struggle to learn in traditional school models, as well as to meet the needs of students who may be interested in a career in technology fields. CHSDA students will learn both digital arts and core content and demonstrate learning, understanding and application of math, science, English Language Arts, social studies, and other art forms with the creation of digital products- games, recordings, or films – that shows mastery of essential concepts. “

The request sought, among other costs, $110,000 for a curriculum director and technology director, $75,000 to build and equip a recording arts studio, $92,000 for a film editing lab, and $20,000 for a 3D printer, laptops for teachers, smartboards and other equipment.

Because the state did not award the grant, Dobrzynski said she is seeking other grants or donations to start serious planning. She said she should know by the end of January if the school is likely to start in the fall, or will need another year of planning.

Helen Williams, the education programs director of the Cleveland Foundation, said the school will add another choice for students as part of the Cleveland school district’s portfolio model, in which students can pick schools with specialized styles.

Williams compared the School for the Digital Arts to the Cleveland School of Science and Medicine at the John Hay campus or the technology-centric MC2STEM High School that’s split between Cleveland State University, the Great Lakes Science Center and General Electric’s Nela Park campus.

Like those schools, Williams said that Digital Arts will teach through hands-on projects, help students understand possible careers in digital arts and hopefully link students to internships and workplace experiences.

“It’s a growing field from a commercial point of view and an employment point of view, and something that really intrigues a lot of young people,” Williams said. “We’re very excited about it. It will be a different kind of learning environment and it will add to the district’s choices.”

Dobrzynski said the concept came out of an arts-based job training called ArtWorks that Young Audiences started in 2005. She said that four years ago, the program added digital arts – recording and digital game design.

“That’s where teenagers are today,” she said. “They’re very comfortable working in digital media.”

She said she was struck with how engaged students were in the digital work. They came in early and stayed late as they tried to figure out how to make their projects work.

Since the program wasn’t letting students make “shooter games,” students had to create more detailed scenarios. That led to them having to research the settings, whether historical or location – to make the games more realistic.

Students had to learn math and programming details, along with graphic design, to create the games. Recording and film projects needed splicing and editing skills. And every film needs a script, which had students writing and researching topics for documentaries.

“Kids were taking responsibility for their own learning,” she said.

So she started thinking about using digital arts as the model for an entire school. She found a few schools that did parts of it – the High Tech High charter school model in San Diego, the High School for the Recording Arts in St. Paul, Minn., and the Quest to Learn schools in New York – but none use digital arts the way she envisions.

“it’s a very unique concept,” Dobrzynski said. There are bits and pieces of this around the country and this is a way to put it all together.”

Source: Cleveland.com

Americans for the Arts & Vans Custom Culture Partner for Student Creativity

Contest Registration Open for High Schools Now!

For the second year, Americans for the Arts is parntering with Vans for their fifth annual Vans Custom Culture – an art and design competition to celebrate student creativity and support arts education. Starting yesterday, January 6, high school art teachers can register for their students to vie against schools across the country to create the most artistic designs using blank Vans shoes as a canvas. The winning school will receive a $50,000 donation for their school art program, and one of the shoe designs will be put into production for sale in select Vans retail stores. Vans will also donate $50,000 to Americans for the Arts to continue their work advancing arts education throughout the United States.

Vans Custom Culture was created to inspire and empower high school students to embrace their creativity through art and design, and call attention to the fact that school art programs are suffering due to diminishing education budgets. Since its inception in 2010 with 326 participating schools, the contest has grown to almost 2,000 schools expected to participate this year. To date, Vans Custom Culture has reached hundreds of thousands of students and put more than $290,000 back into high school art programs.

Beginning today through Feb. 14 at 12:00 noon PST, high school art teachers can register their students for the 2014 competition on the Vans Custom Culture website (registration will be capped at 2,000 schools). Students will be tasked with designing four pairs of blank Vans shoes each to depict one of four themes representing the Vans “Off the Wall” lifestyle: action sports, art, music, and local flavor. Vans employees pick the top 50 schools to be semi-finalists, the public votes on the semi-finalist school’s deisgns between April 25 and May 12, and then the top five finalist schools will travel to New York City to showcase their designs for celebrity judges and the chance to win $50,000. Vans will also donate $4,000 to each of the four runner-up schools.

For information and registration guidelines visit the Custom Culture website.

Rhode Island Removing Sales Tax on Artwork

Rhode Island is elimintating the state tax on artwork and liquor. Starting Dec. 1, the sales tax for any original or limited edition works of art was eliminated as the state launches a first-in-the-nation statewide arts district. Additionally, starting Dec. 1, wine and spirits purchased from a liquor store in Rhode Island will no longer carry a 7-percent sales tax, but beer and other alcoholic beverages will. State Tax Administrator David M. Sullivan says the tax relief should help spur sales and boost the state’s economy at an important time for retailers. Art must be limited or original work, and does not have to be made in Rhode Island but does have to be sold there.

That includes “a book or other writing, a play, a musical composition, a painting, a print, a photograph, a sculpture, the creation of a film, the creation of a dance, and traditional crafts and fine crafts,” according to the division.

“Fine art photography” will also qualify, but commercial photography such as wedding photos will not qualify.

Source: Americans for the Arts

Suggested Reading

To Thrive, Do Work That Interests Donors, Don’t Cut Programs, Says Leader: To succeed, arts groups must believe their work is never done, says Michael Kaiser, president of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, in his new book, The Cycle: A Practical Approach to Managing Arts Organizations.

Mr. Kaiser, who will step down from his post in December 2014, discusses his advice for nonprofit leaders in an interview with The Chronicle.

Online Gifts Rose 16% During Holiday Season

Online gifts in the last two months of 2013 rose 16 percent higher than in the same months in 2012, according to Network for Good, a nonprofit that processes gifts made electronically.

Donations from November 1 to December 31 last year rose to $77.9-million, up from $67.1-million in 2012. The size of the average gift was one reason for the growth: The average donation increased 10 percent, from $157 in 2012 to $172 last year.

Network for Good says the number of donations it handled increased 6 percent, with December 3, a day dubbed Giving Tuesday because nonprofits aggressively promoted donations, providing a boost in online giving.

While some observers had worried that Giving Tuesday donations might replace last-minute gifts people often make at year’s end, those worries seemed to be unfounded.

“Giving Tuesday and all of those giving activities earlier in the giving season didn’t seem to impact the total dollars or the number of donations in the last three days of the year,” says Caryn Stein, director of content strategy at Network for Good. She said the same proportion of donations, about 10 percent, were made online during the last few days of the year, as had been the case in recent years.

Using data from Network for Good, The Chronicle tracked daily online-fundraising totals for more than 14,000 charities over three years. View the most up-to-date results now.

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2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio Winners Announced

Six winners have been selected to receive the 2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio. The awards will be presented at a luncheon ceremony honoring the winners and members of the Ohio Legislature at noon on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at the Columbus Athenaeum in downtown Columbus. The luncheon is hosted by the Ohio Arts Council and Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation. Winners will receive an original work of art by Ohio painter Steven Walker at a public ceremony during the luncheon.
 
Winners were selected from 76 nominations submitted by individuals and organizations throughout Ohio. The award categories and recipients are: Arts Administration, Sherri Geldin, Wexner Center for the Arts (Columbus); Arts Education, Dancing Wheels Company & School (Cleveland); Arts Patron, The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation (Cincinnati); Business Support of the Arts, Macy’s, Inc. (Statewide); Community Development and Participation, Neal Gittleman, Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra(Dayton); Individual Artist, Sheri Williams, Dayton Contemporary Dance Company (Dayton).
 
In attendance at the 2014 Governor’s Awards Selection Committee meeting were four Ohio Arts Council board members and three members who were selected by Ohio Citizens for the Arts. They were: Committee Chair Sara Vance Waddell (Cincinnati), Juan Cespedes (Columbus), Jane Foulk (Thornville), Sharon Howard (Dayton), Katerina Ruedi Ray (Bowling Green), Jeff Strayer (North Canton) and Buzz Ward (Cincinnati).
 
The Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio & Arts Day Luncheon will be held in conjunction with Arts Day on Wednesday, May 21, 2014. This daylong event demonstrating public value and support for the arts is sponsored by the Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation. Arts Day will include an arts advocacy briefing, legislative visits, an arts showcase, Statehouse tours and student exhibitions. For more information on Arts Day 2014, visit www.ohiocitizensforthearts.org or call 614/221-4064.
 
Arts Day was created to foster a greater awareness of the value of the arts in Ohio. Citizens are encouraged to participate in Arts Day by visiting with their state legislators and communicating the need for public support of the arts and arts education. Every year on Arts Day, the Capitol is filled with arts supporters sharing the importance of the arts to their communities.
 
The 2014 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio & Arts Day Luncheon are presented in partnership with the Ohio Channel.
 
More information about the Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio & Arts Day Luncheon, including a full list of past winners and program advertising information, is available on the Ohio Arts Council website.
 
About the Ohio Arts Council: 
The Ohio Arts Council is a state agency that funds and supports quality arts experiences to strengthen Ohio communities culturally, educationally and economically.
 
About Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation: 
Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation provides information to all Ohioans about the arts and promotes their value to a high quality of life, a strong economy and the achievement of educational excellence. The foundation was formed in 1990 as a companion organization to Ohio Citizens for the Arts, which was established in 1976. Ohio Citizens for the Arts is a statewide, nonprofit grassroots membership organization focused on increasing public support for the arts in Ohio. Through the efforts of thousands of individuals and arts and education organizations, Ohio Citizens for the Arts advocates on behalf of the Ohio Arts Council and the arts throughout the state.
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